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Appealing a Sentence in British Columbia – What does it Mean?

Court of Appeal

Appealing a Sentence in British Columbia – What does it Mean?

Were you convicted when you were found guilty of a crime?

Did you receive a sentence after being found guilty or pleading guilty to committing a crime?

Was the decision unreasonable? Can it be supported by the evidence? Did the lower court judge make an error in law? Was there a miscarriage of justice?

Was your sentence imposed within the past 30 days?

If the answer to the above question is “Yes”, you may be able to appeal your sentence.

Simply, to appeal a sentence means to apply for a review of the decision of the lower court. In British Columbia, appeals from the Provincial Court are heard in the BC Supreme Court and appeals from the BC Supreme Court are heard in the BC Court of Appeal.

Commonly, grounds for an appeal are either based on an error in law or procedure; not facts.

In submitting a notice of appeal based on error in law or procedure, we are arguing that the judge made a mistake in the court proceeding concerning a matter of law or procedure. An example of an error in law is a judge that improperly admits evidence during trial that should have be excluded based on a violation of Section 8 (Right to be secure against unreasonable search and seizure) of The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

It is important to note that the purpose of an appeal is not to retry the case. This means that lawyers will not submit new evidence or present witnesses. Rather, the focus of an appeal is to correct an error that was made by the lower court or guide the interpretation of the law.

The appeal process can be quite complex. Before you make a decision to appeal your case, talk to a criminal lawyer. Having an experienced criminal lawyer on your team can help increase the chance of a positive outcome.

Contact us if you are thinking about appealing your case.

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